Clinical networks

To encourage an engaged and vocal membership, we have clinical networks broadly organised around particular areas of interest.

Psychiatrists working with refugees and asylum-seekers often feel overwhelmed by the wide range of problems encountered, like accommodation, language barriers, immigration status and estrangement from family members, all of which have an effect on their prognosis. Without access to psychological services, the only treatment is with medication. Often, psychiatrists lack information on specific resources for this group.

Our network allows interested psychiatrists to communicate with other colleagues in Psychiatry through the sharing of information, knowledge and peer support.

Aims

  • To allow psychiatrists working with asylum seekers and refugees to maintain an awareness of this changing and evolving area.
  • To provide a source of information on resources for this patient group. To share information on the latest evidence base for treatment.
  • To offer peer support, allowing psychiatrists to share accounts of their clinical experience with this group.

Team

Dr Piyal Sen and Dr Katy Briffa.

Background

Asylum-seekers and refugees continue to be a politically contentious area of clinical practice in the UK. Even though there are figures which suggest this group constitute less than 0.5% of the population, and the UK does not figure amongst the top 10 countries in the world with regards to the number of refugees, the political and the tabloid rhetoric would suggest otherwise.

All the evidence points towards a higher level of mental health morbidity in this group, particularly with regards to conditions like PTSD, depression and anxiety. There is a much higher concentration of asylum-seekers and refugees in big cities like London, Birmingham and Manchester, where there is more peer support and access to agencies which offer assistance, both legal and medical. This is despite the National Asylum Support Service (NASS) trying very hard to disperse them to housing all over the UK.

Specialist psychological treatment services for this group, e.g. offering therapy for conditions like PTSD, are hard to access and generally extremely over-subscribed.

Join us

If you are interested in joining, please email us.

This network is jointly run with our Forensic Psychiatry Faculty.

Aims  

  • To develop a forum for communication for psychiatrists working in prison and in community diversion services.
  • To explore and develop standards and competencies relating to these areas.
  • To identify the nature of mental health service provision and specific training opportunities in these areas.
  • To identify areas of best practice and disseminate them. 
  • To influence care pathways to enable community mental health services to work more effectively with prison mental health teams.
  • To develop links with other stakeholders, such as the Sainsbury’s Centre, Department of Health, the Howard League for penal reform and the Prison reform Trust.

Join us

If you are interested in joining, please email us.

Aims

The overarching aim of our network is to bring together clinicians and researchers interested in the field of OCD and related disorders and to provide them with a credible platform which would serve as a catalyst for the improvement of clinical services and advancement of the field.

  • Promote teaching, research and best practice via the website and a newsletter covering latest updates in research and service development, funding opportunities, best practice examples and other relevant information in the field.
  • In line with NICE guidance, encourage improved diagnosis and better deployment of service resources for the treatment of these illnesses.
  • Holding regular scientific meetings to bring clinicians and researchers together on one platform to encourage exchange of ideas and foster debates.
  • Promote public awareness of the illness in the form of patient information leaflets, informational booklets or public statements, mainly via the website and with support from various College faculties.
  • Act in an advisory role to influence better service provision by providing advice to the College on matters within the remit of OCD and its associated condition, as requested. We would be prepared to offer advice to legislative bodies and governmental agencies, and cooperate on national and international treatment guidelines at the request of the College. We would also explore the feasibility of accrediting OCD services and act as a resource on these illnesses.

Background

(OCARD) constitute a significant proportion of the non-psychotic disorders, as seen in clinical practice. Research in the last two decades has increased our understanding of the causes and treatment of these disorders.

The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) has attempted to standardise the care with the introduction of stepped care in its 2005 guidance on Obsessive Compulsive and Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD).

However despite these advances, OCD and related disorders like Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD), tic disorders, hoarding disorder and trichotillomania remain under-diagnosed and under-treated with a huge variation in care across United Kingdom.

Join us

College members are encouraged to register their interest in the network by dropping us an email.

We welcome non-psychiatrists including:

  • psychologists,
  • occupational therapists,
  • nurses,
  • psychiatrists not yet qualified as a college members,
  • members of public,
  • representatives of charitable organisations
  • international psychiatrists.

We will be sending out regular newsletters and information on opportunities in this field to our mailing list subscribers.

Please email if you would like to be included on this mailing list.

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