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Dr Kate Lovett

Dr Kate Lovett

Dean

Kate is the Dean and is the chief academic officer of the College. She is elected for the period 2016–2021.

Dr Kate Lovett studied Medicine at the Universities of St. Andrews and Manchester. Having been awarded a Distinction in Psychiatry at finals, Kate trained as a Psychiatrist in the Northwest obtaining the MRCPsych in 1995.

She completed an MSc in Clinical Psychiatry in 1997 researching the role of ovarian steroids in postnatal depression. Kate trained both full time and flexibly completing specialist training in 2001. She has worked for Devon Partnership Trust as a Consultant Psychiatrist in General Adult Psychiatry since 2001 as an inpatient and crisis consultant.

She was an Associate Medical Director between 2008 and 2010 and has been in her current role as a community psychiatrist for the past 5 years.

Kate has a longstanding interest in training and education. She has been undergraduate Psychiatry lead for Peninsula Medical School and Training Programme Director for Adult Psychiatry.

Kate completed a Postgraduate Certificate of Clinical Education with Distinction in 2008. She served on the Education, Training and Standards Committee at the Royal College of Psychiatrists between 2010 and 2014 and on the South West Division between 2010 and 2016. Kate was appointed as CASC (Clinical Assessment of Skills and Competencies) examiner in 2008 and became a lead examiner in 2014.

She was Head of School of Psychiatry for the Peninsula Deanery for four and a half years until 2016 when she gave up this role having been elected Dean of the Royal College of Psychiatrists. In that role she has lead work on recruitment and retention in the mental health workforce and been a driving force behind the #ChoosePsychiatry campaign.

Her drive to develop systems that support compassionate care and recovery fuels her educational leadership and is underpinned by values of equity and fairness.

Get in contact to receive further information regarding a career in psychiatry