Programme

View the Congress 2024 programme overview.

View more information about our social and fringe events.

View the 2024 Congress Student and Trainee guide.

Please note that the programme is still subject to change and all times are listed in BST.

The RCPsych International Congress is an annual flagship event, where leading psychiatrists from across the world meet to share knowledge, debate, collaborate, educate and network.

To encourage open dialogue, scientific discovery and enrich learning, we provide our delegates with the opportunity to hear from a diverse range of views and presentations. All the speakers, panellists and participants views and comments are their own and not the established views of the College. Speakers should expect probing questions and healthy debate.

The College expects all content of event programmes, and the behaviour of the speakers and the delegates, to be professional, respectful and to uphold the College values.

The College does not endorse any programme content or behaviour displaying any form of prejudice or discrimination.

Sunday 16 June

  • Come along to the venue and collect your badge to skip the Monday morning queues! Once you have collected your badge you will have full access to Congress and be able to walk straight in to the lectures on Monday morning
  • We will be kicking off our fringe programme with a welcome reception on Sunday 16 June from 5.00pm - 6.30pm. We hope this will be an opportunity to catch up with colleagues and friends ahead of the Congress. What better way is there to start Congress 2023 off in style?

    We are aware that Eid al-Adha is due to fall during the Congress, and as this is a time of celebration for many of you, we would like to invite you to join us for the reception in your traditional dress.

  • Following an incredibly successful launch and continued popularity at the 2023 International Congress, the Mindmasters quiz returns for its third year in 2024! Members from across the UK will form teams to compete to become the RCPsych Mindmasters champions. Will your team be champions of RCPsych Mindmasters 2024?
  • 8.00am - 10.00am
    Strathblane hall
    Registration
  • Chair: Professor Stephen Lawrie, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    Professor Elizabeth Hughes, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow

    Addressing the gap: navigating the reproductive and sexual health needs of women with common and serious mental illness

    Dr Holly Hope, University of Manchester, Manchester

    Delivering sexual and reproductive healthcare within a psychiatric inpatient setting: a service evaluation 

    Dr Nicole Needham, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh and Alison Milne, NHS Lothian

  • Chair: Professor Asit Biswas, Leicester Partnership Trust, Honorary Professor University of Leicester, Leicester

    The reviewer and research integrity

    Dr William Lee, Peninsula Medical School, University of Plymouth, Plymouth

    Writing a book review

    Professor Femi Oyebode, Honorary Professor of Psychiatry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham

    Walking you through a review

    Professor Patricia Casey, Hermitage Medical Clinic, University College, Dublin

  • Chair: Dr Elaine Lockhart, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Far away from home: adolescent inpatient admissions far from home, out-of-area or to adult wards - a national surveillance study

    Professor Kapil Sayal, University of Nottingham, Nottingham

    Admissions at-distance, out-of-region, and to adult psychiatric wards in CAMHS: Findings from the Far Away from Home Study

    Dr Josephine Holland, University of Nottingham, Nottingham

    Changing the narrative around CAMHS crisis teams: Strengthening Crisis Team provision for young people via technology enhanced assessment and training- The SCriPT Project

    Professor Paul Tiffin, University of York, York

  • Chair: Dr Trudi Seneviratne, Registrar, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Infant and early childhood mental health: key issues

    Dr Clare Lamb, Honorary (unpaid) Consultant child & adolescent psychiatrist. South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Previous lead for under 5s mental health, London

    Infant and early childhood mental health - a key public mental health opportunity

    Dr Jonathan Campion, Clinical and Strategic Co-director of Public Mental Health Implementation Centre (Royal College of Psychiatrists), Director for Public Mental Health and Consultant Psychiatrist (South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust), Public Mental Health Advisor (WHO Europe), Chair of Public Mental Health Special Interest Group (World Psychiatric Association), Co-Chair of Public Mental Health Working Group (World Federation of Public Health Associations), Honorary Professor of Public Mental Health (University of Cape Town, South Africa) 

    The child's voice and an example of good practice

    Ms Natasha Manning, Project Manager, Wandsworth Early Help Parental Mental Health Service, London

    Key messages and next steps

    Dr Lade Smith CBE, President, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

  • Chair: Dr Rachel Gibbons, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Sharing the burden and learning together – themes from a group for psychiatrists affected by suicide

    Dr Jan Birtle, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Dr Nisha Shah, Camden and Islington NHS Trust, London

    Dr Karen Lascelles, Oxford Health, Oxford

    Supporting doctors in training through inquests

    Dr Hannah Cappleman, Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust

  • 11.15am - 11.45am
    Lennox
    Morning break
  • Speakers

    Professor Ian Jones and Professor Stephen Lawrie, Congress Co-Chairs and Dr Abdul Raoof, Associate Dean for Advanced Learning and Conferences.

  • Speakers

    Chair: Professor Ian Jones and Professor Stephen Lawrie, Congress Co-Chairs

    Dr Lade Smith CBE, President, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Read more about this speaker

  • Overview

    This presentation will present recent data on the age of onset for mental disorders, based on the World Mental Health Survey (29 countries, 156,331 respondents). The lifetime prevalence of any mental disorder was 28·6% (95% CI 27·9-29·2) for male respondents and 29·8% (29·2-30·3) for female respondents. Morbid risk of any mental disorder by age 75 years was 46·4% (44·9-47·8) for male respondents and 53·1% (51·9-54·3) for female respondents. Conditional probabilities of first onset peaked at approximately age 15 years, with a median age of onset of 19 years (IQR 14-32) for male respondents and 20 years (12-36) for female respondents. By age 75 years, approximately half the population can expect to develop one or more of the 13 mental disorders considered in this study. These disorders typically first emerge in childhood, adolescence, or young adulthood.

    Speakers

    Chair: Professor Fiona Gaughran, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Professor John J. McGrath, Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research, and National Centre for Register-based Research, Aarhus University

    Read more about this speaker

  • 12.55pm - 1.55pm
    Lennox
    Lunch
  • Overview

    The Climate and Ecological crises are the greatest threat to human health and emotional wellbeing the world is facing. This clear and current danger can provoke a range of complex emotional reactions such as anxiety, despair, hopelessness and anger. Daily life can provide few opportunities to talk about what our changing world means for us, our families, our social and cultural values, as well as our mental health and wellbeing.

    Join us in this taster climate café led by trained facilitators. We will provide a confidential and welcoming group space to connect with others and share thoughts, feelings and reactions related to the Climate and Ecological Crisis. The Café is an advice free zone and doesn’t advocate specific actions, but instead provides an opportunity to reflect and engage. No previous knowledge is necessary, and you can share as little or as much as you feel comfortable to. By coming together, we know that we are not alone, and can start to think about how we might take on this challenge that we are all facing.

    Speakers

    Dr Dasal Abayaratne, Sheffield Health and Social Care NHS Foundation Trust
    Elspeth Crawford, Climate Psychology Alliance
    Dr Louise Robinson, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust
    Dr Josephine Fielding, West London NHS Trust 


  • Do you want to be a driving force for change and improve the public perception of mental illness and psychiatry? 

    We are recruiting champions from across the College to reshape the narrative around mental illness, develop better understanding of psychiatric treatments and increase awareness of the role of psychiatrists.

    The RCPsych Ambassador network is for anyone who is part of the College community, members, patients & carers, staff and honorary fellows. 

    Inspired to use your voice? Join us at the RCPsych Ambassador workshop at Congress 2024. This is your chance to gain the skills to represent your profession and influence change. 

    Workshop highlights: 

    The session will equip you with a clear understanding of the role of the RCPsych Ambassador including practical strategies, resources to get you started, an introduction to the network, understanding of how the media works, being savvy on social media, and top tips for a successful mental health champion.

    Speakers

    Corinne Bishop, Director of Strategic Communications, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Sal Lalji, Head of External Affairs, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Angela McCrimmon, Expert by experience

    Peter Markham, Head of Digital, Royal College of Psychiatrists

  • Screen: One
    Category: Research
    Judge: Dr Toral Thomas

    Posters: A systematic review of the financial impact of living as an autistic person in the UK; Modafinil in post-traumatic brain injury apathy: a sleeping giant?; Investigating history of suicidal ideation among patients attending early intervention for psychosis services: a retrospective analysis using clinical records; Quantifying the core deficit in classical schizophrenia from three independent samples of psychosis spectrum patients; Determinants of physical health outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar affective disorder

    Screen: Two
    Category: Service evaluation, audit and Margaret Slack Award
    Judge: Dr Ian Hall

    Posters: Harm-reduction for substance misuse in young people: a service evaluation of Southampton’s Drug and Alcohol Support Hub (DASH); Review of Rapid Tranquilisation guidelines across NHS trusts in England; Improving acute-treatment of alcohol withdrawal at an inpatient de-addiction ward (‘Vimukthi’) at Kerala State, India: full cycle of a clinical audit; Margaret Slack Travelling Fellowship Winner: difficult capacity cases in the general hospital; Mind over menopause: bridging the gap in mental health care
  • Meet your SAS committee officers during this lunch time session taking place in the SAS doctors lounge
  • 12.55pm - 1.55pm
    Student and trainees' lounge
    Student and trainee lounge: trainee wellbeing, coaching and mentoring
  • Chair: Professor Fiona Gaughran, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Breaking the silence: treating trauma in persistent psychosis

    Dr Amy Hardy, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Spurious autobiographical memory of psychosis

    Professor Eric Chen, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

    An aetiological approach to the treatment of psychosis

    Professor Robin Murray. Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London

  • Chair: Dr Faith Ndebele, Solent NHS Trust, Portsmouth

    Dr Geraldine Strathdee, Department of Health and Social Care, London

    Professor Subodh Dave, Dean, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    RCPsych Data and Digital Literacy competencies

    Dr Asif Bachlani, Priory Group, Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Trust, Derby

  • Chair: Dr Christelle Langley, University of Cambridge, Cambridge

    Ms Aida Seyedsalehi, University of Oxford, Oxford

    Developing risk prediction models for adverse psychiatric outcomes: from electronic health records to ‘omics

    Dr Emanuele Osimo,  University of Cambridge, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Trust, Cambridge

    Digital psychiatry in the Mental Health Mission

    Professor Graham Murray, University of Cambridge, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Trust, Cambridge

  • Chair: Professor Daniel Smith, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    Seasonal variation of diabetic markers in bipolar disorder

    Dr Amber Roguski, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    Sleep detectives: stratifying the circuitry of disordered cognition through the lens of sleep

    Professor Matt Jones, University of Bristol, Bristol

    The light hypersensitivity hypothesis of bipolar disorder: implications for treatment

    Professor Daniel Smith, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

  • Chair: Professor Gavin Reynolds, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, RDaSH NHS Trust, Doncaster

    Childhood neglect and cognitive function in psychosis: the mediating role of inflamatory response

    Professor Gary Donohoe, School of Psychology, NUI Galway, Galway

    Early life stress in first episode psychosis and animal models - the role of DNA methylation

    Dr Camila Loureiro, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo

    Understanding the nature of the link between trauma and psychosis: psychological and biological mechanisms, and how to translate them to clinical practice

    Dr Luis Alameda, Department of Psychiatry, Service of General Psychiatry, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne

  • Chair: Dr Himanshu Tyagi, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, London

    rTMS for OCD: Neurobiological basis and evidence

    Dr Shyam Sundar Arumugham, Additional Professor of Psychiatry, NIMHANS, Bengaluru

    Deep brain stimulation in OCD: is there an optimal target?

    Dr Himanshu Tyagi, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, London

    Advanced neurosurgical interventions in OCD

    Dr David Christmas, Consultant Psychiatrist at the Advanced Interventions Service 

  • Chair: Dr Derek Tracy, West London NHS Trust, London

    Professor Gin Malhi, University of Sydney, Sydney

    BJPsych Open: growth, quality and vision

    Professor Kenneth Kaufman, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Jersey

    Publishing in BJPsych Bulletin

    Dr Andrew Forrester, University of Cardiff, Cardiff

    BJPsych International

    Dr Marinos Kyriakopoulos, Editor in Chief, BJPsych International, London

    BJPsych Advances: continuing professional development in psychiatry, advancing clinical practice

    Professor Asit Biswas, Editor in Chief, BJPsych Advances, Nottingham

  • Chair: Dr Swapna Kongara, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    The results of a national survey of psychiatrists who have undergone investigation

    Dr Rachel Gibbons, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    An impeccable clinician or a blameworthy individual? How do you repair and restore your identity during and after an investigation?

    Dr Swapna Kongara, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    A buffer against strong currents: the right leadership to support doctors under investigations or at risk of investigations 

    Dr Ananta Dave, Black Country Integrated Care Board, Wolverhampton

  • Chair: Professor Fiona Gaughran, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Clozapine and mortality: what is the evidence?

    Professor James MacCabe, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Does reducing/stooping cannabis use impact on the outcome of psychotic disorders: preliminary data from the Cannabis Clinic for Psychosis

    Dr Marta Di Forti, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Therapeutic potential of TAAR1 agonists in the treatment of mental disorders

    Dr Grazia Rutigliano, King's College London, London

  • Chair: Dr Vimal Sivasanker, Essex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust 

    Dr Mayura Deshpande, Southern Health, London

    What is the Safety Incident Response Accreditation Network (SIRAN) and what can it do for you?

    Ms Tracy Ward, Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust, Leicester and Elizabeth Rye, Expert by Experience

    Safety standards in mental health services: what are we missing?

    Mr Chris Dzikiti, CQC, London

  • 4.40pm - 5.10pm
    Lennox
    Afternoon break
  • Overview

    Life style factors such as kinds of physical exercise and activities, restorative sleep, types of food one consumes, stress reduction, social connectedness, and avoiding harmful substances, have significant effects on prevention or improvement of various mental and physical disorders, and promoting mental and physical wellness, fitness and vitality. This lecture will discuss the evidence base for the effectiveness of some of these factors, and the underlying biological mechanisms. The objective of this lecture is to encourage clinicians to incorporate specific lifestyle interventions in their practice, in addition to psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and socio-economic interventions.

    Speakers

    Chair: Dr Abdul Raoof, Associate Dean for Advanced Learning and Conferences

    Ramaswamy Viswanathan, MD, DrMedSc, President, American Psychiatric Association

    Find out more about this speaker

  • Overview

    Many, if not most, patients faced with complex mental health problems have experienced early adversities, including traumas, that lie at the root of their current struggles. In general, these adverse experiences interfere with the fulfillment of universal emotional needs that children have. As a result, dysfunctional representations (schemas) of the self, others, and the world develop that usually contain strong emotional meanings. In an attempt to deal with such emotional memories, dysfunctional strategies are often used, that lead to and maintain psychopathological symptoms. Moreover, such strategies interfere with functioning and reduce quality of life. 

    Many treatments, whether psychological or pharmacological, focus on trying to get patients out of their current problematic state, without addressing the underlying representations. This negligence is probably related to the limited success and high relapse rates that are so common in treatments, for example in the case of depression. 

    In this plenary lecture I will argue that a focus on the unmet emotional needs of patients during their development and the associated emotional memories/schemas helps to bring about lasting change. I will also highlight some central therapeutic techniques to accomplish this, varying from the therapeutic relationship to trauma/emotional memory processing techniques. The essence in these techniques is that offering corrective experiences when the emotional memory is activated leads to stable recovery. 

    Speakers

    Chair: Professor Subodh Dave, Dean, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Professor Emeritus Arnoud Arntz, University of Amsterdam

    Read more about this speaker

  • Directly following his plenary lecture titled, 'Personality disorders and complex trauma unlocked: how to work with universal emotional needs', Professor Emeritus Arnoud Arntz will be answering your questions!

    You will be able to submit questions for Professor Arntz through the Congress app, or ask them live in the room.

  • Come and join us for some stand up comedy with a mental health theme. This will be a ‘Bright Club’ style event – where funny meets brains – headlined by none other than Sophie Scott from University College London.

    We are also looking for 4-6 volunteers to do 5-7 minute sets, and will coach them to develop a script and make it funny! All you’ll need is something you want to say – be it alternative, anecdotal, observational, satirical – it doesn’t even really need to be about mental health.  We are looking for a broad range of presenters from any background. If you want to give it a try, and get accolades from your peers for years to come, please email: s.lawrie@ed.ac.uk

  • Overview

    This session will explore how creative arts (specifically literature, poetry and music) may ameliorate our personal and vicarious experiences of existential despair. Professor Christopher Dowrick will consider how creative arts enable us to acknowledge the deeply inconsolable, to ‘think’ reality when ordinary human thought falls short, to allow for the possibility of imagining the ‘shabby, confused, agonised crisis which is the common reality of suicide’ and to develop empathy towards individuals who seek it.

    With the help of Leo Tolstoy, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Ludwig van Beethoven and Bruce Springsteen, Professor Dowrick will explain how creative arts can broaden our approach to mental health promotion and suicide prevention.

    They allow us the possibility of imagining suicide and of feeling empathy towards individuals who undertake it. We become more able to turn towards suffering, more curious about the person’s experience, and more present and engaged. With the result that we can sit with and listen to the person in despair. Bearing witness to suffering, giving the other person a sense of being understood and accepted, is the first essential step towards hope.

    Speakers

    Professor Christopher Dowrick, University of Liverpool, Liverpool


  • Join members of the Planetary Health and Sustainability Committee, Dr Katherine Witter and Dr Philippa Clery for a Nature Walk around Edinburgh. 
     
    This will be a great way to explore the city, learn more about nature and mental health, and meet other like-minded conference attendees. 
     
    We will meet at 6.30pm in front of the main entrance to the conference centre. The session will last around 1 hour and the walk itself will be around 45 mins

  • 8.00am - 9.00am
    Strathblane hall
    Registration
  • Founded in 2017, the Congress Run is a guided 5km jog for all abilities. Meeting outside the Conference Centre main entrance at 8am the route passes highlights of Edinburgh including the Royal Mile, Edinburgh Castle and the Meadows. Whatever your pace, this friendly event is an established highlight of the conference social programme
  • Staying calm in the midst of a storm - mindfulness for psychiatrists

    The current NHS pressures put a huge strain on the NHS, and on psychiatry staff at all levels, and in all sub-specialties. Emotional well-being of psychiatrists and the population as a whole is affected by the uncertainty and the sense of unrelenting demands arising from the crisis, aggravated further by a catastrophic economic downturn and societal dissatisfaction. Strikes of consultants and junior doctors have highlighted the sense of unease in psychiatry, and medicine at large. 

    Mindfulness-based intervention can have a positive influence on the well-being of health professionals as reflected by the NICE guidance for staff well-being recommending mindfulness-based programs (NICE March 2022) . 

    Florian Ruths and Joy Patterson  have developed a taster program of three  45-minute sessions during the congress to introduce psychiatrists to the ideas of mindfulness.

    Mindfulness for Psychiatrists (M4P) are three daily, brief, practical introductions to mindfulness during challenging times for psychiatry and the world at large. Its aim is to provide psychiatrists with a tool to touch base with calmness, self-compassion, keeping perspective and enhancing self-regulation and well-being while under clinical, social and personal pressure. The three sessions are different and can be enjoyed as a series. Each session works on its own as well.

    Facilitators

    Dr Florian Alexander Ruths, Maudsley Hospital

    Dr Joy Patterson, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust


  • 8.00am - 8.45am
    Menteith
    Fringe: Yoga
  • Overview

    Andrew will present the most recent advances from over 30 years of molecular genetic research in depression and provide a map for how this information can be used to improve clinical care.

    Speakers

    Chair: Professor John Crichton, Treasurer, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Professor Andrew M McIntosh, Division of Psychiatry, University of Edinburgh

    Read more about this speaker

  • Overview

    I will talk about what it is like being a patient with severe mental illness, who subsequently trained as a psychiatrist. My experiences of psychiatric diagnoses, in-patient treatment, medication and ECT (electroconvulsive therapy), have undoubtedly influenced my personality and my practice as a doctor.  I am now a consultant psychiatrist, working in the same hospital (Royal Edinburgh Hospital) where I was first an in-patient, kept well by medication and maintenance ECT (also in the Royal Edinburgh Hospital). Like others with severe mental illness, I have at times experienced stigma, but I hope that mine is also a positive story. In recent years I have written extensively - in my blog and my memoir, as well as fiction. I also write poetry, and found this a comfort when I was unable to concentrate after a course of ECT. My story is personal, and is an acknowledgement that, with the right support and help, it can be possible to live with severe mental illness.  Ultimately, it is a story of hope.

    Speakers

    Chair: Professor Stephen Lawrie, Congress Co-Chair

    Dr Rebecca Lawrence, Consultant Psychiatrist, NHS Lothian

    Read more about this speaker

  • Overview

    Insomnia is present in up to one third of the adult population worldwide. It can present independently or coexist with other medical conditions such as mental illnesses, metabolic, or cardiovascular diseases highlighting the importance of treating this multifaceted disorder. Insomnia is associated with an abnormal state of hyperarousal (increased somatic, cognitive, and cortical activation) and orexin has been identified as a key promotor of arousal and vigilance. The current standards of care for the treatment of insomnia recommend non-pharmacological interventions (e.g. CBT I) as first-line treatment and if behavioural interventions are not effective or available, pharmacotherapy.  In contrast to most hypnotics used for decades (benzodiazepines and ‘Z-drugs’), the latest Orexin Receptor Antagonists do not modulate the activity of γ-aminobutyric acid receptors, the main inhibitory mechanism of the central nervous system. Instead, they temporarily block the orexin pathway, causing a different pattern of effects, e.g. fewer morning or next-day effects such as motor dyscoordination, and cognitive impairment. The pharmacological properties of these drugs are the basis of these different characteristics. Orexin receptor antagonists seem to be devoid of any dependence and tolerance-inducing effects, rendering them a viable option for longer-term treatment. Safety studies have not shown any exacerbation of existing respiratory problems, but more real-world safety and pharmacovigilance experience is needed. This plenary lecture provides an overview of the role of orexin in the sleep wake cycle, its mechanism of action, its relation to insomnia, and key features of available drugs mediating orexin signalling.

    Speakers

    Chair: Dr Trudi Seneviratne, Registrar, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Professor Ramalingam N Chithiramohan MBBS FRCpsych

    Read more about this speaker

  • 10.30am - 11.00am
    Lennox
    Morning break
  • Chair: Dr Sophie Behrman, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford and Dr Catherine Durkin, Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Why menopause matters for all psychiatrists

    Dr Trudi Seneviratne, Registrar, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Hormonally informed care - how to integrate menopause into your clinical practice

    Dr Rachel Jones, East London NHS Foundation Trust

    Learning from experts by experience - Dr Sophie Behrman in conversation with Diane Danzebrink

    Dr Sophie Behrman, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford and Diane Danzebrink, Expert by experience, Founder Director of Menopause Support

  • Chair: Dr Rukyya Hassan, Lancashire and South Cumbria NHS Foundation Trust, Freedom from Torture, Lancashire

    Adult asylum seekers and refugees: developments in assessment, diagnosis and management

    Dr Piyal Sen, Medical Director and Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist, Elysium Healthcare, Honorary Professor Brunel University, Milton Keynes

    Supporting unaccompanied minor asylum seekers in day-to-day practice: dealing with extreme trauma while facing uncertainty 

    Dr Veronika Dobler, Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge

    First do no harm: unravelling the adverse mental health impacts of new UK immigration legislation

    Dr Lucia Chaplin, Higher Specialty Trainee, General Adult Psychiatry, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge and Dr Grace Crowley, Core Psychiatry Trainee, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Healing and keeping the hope alive: a lived experience and QI perspective 

    Dr Yasir Hameed, Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich

  • Chair: Professor Tamsin Ford, University of Cambridge, Cambridge

    Eating disorders and social media use in the OxWell Student Survey

    Professor Mina Fazel, University of Oxford, Oxford

    Eating disorders in the national survey – was there a true increase in the prevalence?

    Dr Clara Faria, University of Cambridge, Cambridge

    Social functioning in adolescent eating disorders – a neglected target for intervention 

    Professor Dasha Nicholls, Imperial College London, London

  • Chair: Professor Robin Murray, King's College London, London

    Withdrawal effects and how to stop antidepressants

    Professor David Taylor, King's College London, London

    Withdrawal effects and how to stop benzodiazepines, z-drugs and gabapentinoids

    Dr Mark Horowitz, North East London NHS Foundation Trust , University College London (honorary), London

  • Chair: Dr David Okai, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London and Dr Adam Al-Diwani, University of Oxford, Oxford

    Rational clinical approach to diagnosis and antibody testing in suspected autoimmune encephalitis

    Dr Adam Handel, Oxford Health NHS Trust, University of Oxford, Oxford

    Brains on fire: Patient outcomes and quality of life following autoimmune encephalitis

    Dr Ava Easton, University of Liverpool, Liverpool and Encephalitis International

    Delayed and missed diagnosis: what do we know?

    Dr Janet Grace, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

  • All are welcome to attend this session - the focus will be on 'early-career' psychiatrists - all trainees plus SAS doctors and consultants in their first five years.

    Overview

    1. Learn about the utility of coaching and mentoring - whether one-to-one or in groups - in peer support, training and professional development 
    2. Hear about College resources, peer-support and coach-mentoring schemes across Divisions, Devolved Nations, Faculties and grades and share your reflections
    3. Try your hand at a practical skills exercise in relational skills-sets that are already familiar to psychiatrists, using common job and interpersonal scenarios, to enable appreciation of the two-way partnership of active listening and mutual reflection

    Speakers

    Jeya Balakrishna, Consultant Psychiatrist MOD and Assoc Registrar for Coaching and Mentoring

    Gwen Collin ST6 NHS Leeds and Coaching and Mentoring working group

  • Chair: Professor Allan Young, King's College London, London

    Professor Gary Sachs, Harvard University, Boston

    Dr Kathleen Merikangas, National Institute of Mental Health, Washington

    Challenges in treating rapid cycling bipolar disorders

    Dr Rebecca Strawbridge, King's College London, London

  • Chair: Dr Hugo Critchley, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton

    Dr Trudi Seneviratne, Registrar, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Dr Derek Tracy, West London Mental Health Trust, King's College London, Imperial College London, London

    Why quality research matters: credibility in neuroscience

    Dr Laura Ajram, British Neuroscience Association, Bristol

  • Chair: Dr Chukwuemeka Nwuba, East London NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Dr Nadia Craddock, University of the West of England, Bristol

    Dr Lee Chambers, Essentialise Workplace, Preston

    Ms Kaysha Thomas, Nutritional Therapist, London

  • Chair: Professor Sir Simon Wessely, King's College London, London

    There’s no such thing as an antidepressant

    Professor Joanna Moncrieff, King's College London, London

    Antidepressant deprescribing is not antipsychiatry

    Professor David Taylor, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, London

    Antidepressant effectiveness 

    Professor Glyn Lewis, University College London, London

  • Chair: Dr Alex Thomson, Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Dr Lade Smith CBE, President, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Prioritising care for mental illnesses, in an era of mental wellbeing awareness - a patient perspective

    Dr Emma McAllister, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Dr Rajesh Mohan, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

  • 1.40pm - 2.40pm
    Lennox
    Lunch
  • Join us during the lunch break to meet members of our 15 College Special Interest Groups to learn about each group and meet with like minded individuals. This is an informal drop-in session with executive committee members available to chat to, and answer questions about their SIGs. Lunch will be served in the room
  • Screen: One
    Category: Service evaluation, research and psychopharmacology
    Judge: Professor Mohammed Al-Uzri

    Posters: Effect of cognitive stimulation therapy on cognition and social independence in people with dementia at the North Norfolk memory service; The chicken or the egg? Understanding the temporal relationship between severe mental illness and neurological conditions in a UK primary care cohort; Association between prior antipsychotic adherence and adherence three years after clozapine initiation : a real-world observational study; The efficacy and acceptability of pharmacological treatments for individuals with complex post-traumatic stress disorder: a systematic review and network meta-analysis; Review of melatonin's effectiveness and the side effects on Alzheimer's Disease

    Screen: Two
    Category: Research, quality improvement and education and training
    Judge: Dr Toral Thomas

    Posters: Systematic review of referral and care pathways for children and young people of black ethnicity through child and adolescent mental health services compared with other ethnic groups: an international comparison; An item-level systematic review of the presentation of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in females; Sleep in SYNGAP1-related Intellectual Disability; DNACPR: utilising poster interventions to improve compliance with Scottish Government Guidance; Malawi Mental Health Guide: overview and evaluation of a mental health quick reference guide and phone app for use in non-specialist settings.
  • 1.40pm - 2.40pm
    Lowther
    SAS doctors lounge: Leadership and management
  • Join fellow examiners to network and say hello in this dedicated lunch session hosted by, the outgoing Chief Examiner, Dr Ian Hall and your new Chief Examiner, soon to be announced. Lunch will be served in the room
  • Do you want to be a driving force for change and improve the public perception of mental illness and psychiatry? 

    We are recruiting champions from across the College to reshape the narrative around mental illness, develop better understanding of psychiatric treatments and increase awareness of the role of psychiatrists.

    The RCPsych Ambassador network is for anyone who is part of the College community, members, patients & carers, staff and honorary fellows. 

    Inspired to use your voice? Join us at the RCPsych Ambassador workshop at Congress 2024. This is your chance to gain the skills to represent your profession and influence change. 

    Workshop highlights: 

    The session will equip you with a clear understanding of the role of the RCPsych Ambassador including practical strategies, resources to get you started, an introduction to the network, understanding of how the media works, being savvy on social media, and top tips for a successful mental health champion.

    Speakers

    Corinne Bishop, Director of Strategic Communications, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Sal Lalji, Head of External Affairs, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Angela McCrimmon, Expert by experience

    Peter Markham, Head of Digital, Royal College of Psychiatrists

  • Meet your College Officers in this special session in the student and trainees' lounge during the lunch break
  • Overview

    Stigma impacts quality of life, especially to those with silent illnesses such as epilepsy.  This plenary session addresses stigma during the lifetime of a senior clinical academic psychiatrist, an expert with lived experience, who has dedicated his career to the psychiatric aspects of epilepsy.  Stigma toward epilepsy is not limited to the public but exists within the medical profession and even professional societies.  During this session, specific barriers created by stigma toward epilepsy will be discussed: social integration, education, career paths, employment, marriage with increased divorce rates, parenting, and even sports participation.  Further, potential personal growth secondary to combating stigma will be considered.

    Speakers

    Chair: Dr Lade Smith, President, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Professor Kenneth R. Kaufman, MD, FRCPsych, DLFAPA, FAES, Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    Read more about this speaker

  • Overview

    In this presentation I will explore the science of laughter - from its evolutionary history to the complex ways that humans use laughter in social interactions. I will explore the neurobiology of laughter and the reasons why it could be a very important human behaviour to study in more detail.

    Speakers

    Chair: Professor Subodh Dave, Dean, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Professor Sophie Scott CBE, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London

    Read more about this speaker

  • 3.40pm - 4.10pm
    Lennox
    Afternoon break
  • Chair: Dr Gwen Adshead, West London Trust, London

    Dr Derek Tracy, West London NHS Trust, King's College London, Imperial College London and University College London, London

    The Bayesian brain and predictive coding as a metaphors of the mind (and its disturbances)

    Professor Peggy Seriès, School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    It's the tone that makes the music: psychological dynamics of listening with intent

    Dr Adam Polnay, The State Hospital, NHS Lothian Psychotherapy Department and University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

  • Chair: Dr Jon van Niekerk, Chair General Adult Faculty, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Navigating unknown territory and finding hope: our long journey with out-of-area care

    Mrs Rachel Bannister, Time for Action Foundation, Nottingham

    Dr Rajesh Mohan, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Horatio Clare, Independent Writer and Journalist, London, United Kingdom

  • Chair: Dr Richard Caplan, Psychiatrists' Support Service, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Professor Dame Clare Gerada, Practitioner Health, NHS England

    Dr Alastair Cook, Scottish Government, Edinburgh

    Dr Richard Caplan, Psychiatrists' Support Service, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

  • Chair: Dr Kathleen Merikangas, National Institute of Mental Health, Washington

    Mood disorders: 10 facts for the busy psychiatrist

    Professor Allan Young, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London

    Ten things you should know about ... Schizophrenia

    Professor Stephen Lawrie, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    Dr Sameer Jauhar, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London

  • 6.00pm - 8.00pm
    Pentland
    AGM
  • Are you a student or trainee looking to meet other students and trainees? Then don't miss out on the student and trainee event of the Congress!

    Join friends and colleagues for a relaxed and informal evening at Volcano Falls Adventure Golf. You will have access to two 18 hole courses as well as interactive darts. Unleash your competitive spirit and join us for some friendly competition.

    Book your ticket and find out more information on our website. We have sold out in the past so book early to avoid disappointment.
  • 8.00am - 9.00am
    Strathblane hall
    Registration
  • Staying calm in the midst of a storm - mindfulness for psychiatrists

    The current NHS pressures put a huge strain on the NHS, and on psychiatry staff at all levels, and in all sub-specialties. Emotional well-being of psychiatrists and the population as a whole is affected by the uncertainty and the sense of unrelenting demands arising from the crisis, aggravated further by a catastrophic economic downturn and societal dissatisfaction. Strikes of consultants and junior doctors have highlighted the sense of unease in psychiatry, and medicine at large. 

    Mindfulness-based intervention can have a positive influence on the well-being of health professionals as reflected by the NICE guidance for staff well-being recommending mindfulness-based programs (NICE March 2022) . 

    Florian Ruths and Joy Patterson  have developed a taster program of three  45-minute sessions during the congress to introduce psychiatrists to the ideas of mindfulness.

    Mindfulness for Psychiatrists (M4P) are three daily, brief, practical introductions to mindfulness during challenging times for psychiatry and the world at large. Its aim is to provide psychiatrists with a tool to touch base with calmness, self-compassion, keeping perspective and enhancing self-regulation and well-being while under clinical, social and personal pressure. The three sessions are different and can be enjoyed as a series. Each session works on its own as well.

    Facilitators

    Dr Florian Alexander Ruths, Maudsley Hospital

    Dr Joy Patterson, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust

  • Overview

    In this workshop I will start by discussing what Haiku is, talk about the structure of classical Haiku, and focus on the nature of images in Haiku. I will give examples drawn from Basho (1644-1694) and other masters. Most of the time will be spent on writing Haikus and discussing how to think about Haikus and how to improve on the examples produced during the workshop.

    Speakers

    Professor Femi Oyebode, Professor and Head of Department of Psychiatry, University of Birmingham (Retired)

  • Overview

    An immersive session in which you will emerge with new skills, tools and mindset

    Speakers

    Dr Sridevi Kalidindi, Consultant Psychiatrist, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

  • Overview

    Opioid drugs are widely consumed globally – as prescribed medications, in abuse patterns using pharmaceutical opioids, and also in non-medical abuse of heroin and other opioids. Opioids are associated not only with dependence but also with high risk of overdose death. Globally, more than 150,000 people die annually from opioid overdose, a figure rising sharply in recent years, particularly in North America where mortality rate now exceeds 100,000 annually. 

    Three aspects of clinical practice and public policy need re-consideration: 

    Firstly, the importance of treatment and times of particular importance: Annual mortality rates of those abusing opioids is of the order of 1-2% annually. Treatment with medications such as methadone or buprenorphine is protective against risk of overdose death, reducing it to at least a quarter of the previous level. However we must be alert to the transient return of increased risk of overdose death immediately after cessation of these treatments. Furthermore, risk of overdose death is not evenly distributed – there are times of major concentration, notably following release from prison or discharge from hospital or moving back to community from protected residential rehabilitation. For former prisoners with a history of heroin use, one in 200 is dead within a fortnight of release. Whatever interventions or policies we consider, we must examine how they impact these dark periods, and how we might alter he danger of these periods of predictable risk.

    Secondly, new technologies (apps and wearables): We should by now be able to detect overdose through apps in the wearable devices on which we all increasingly rely. If my smart-watch can detect that I have had a fall, or that I have an unexpected cardiac irregularity, then should we not also use the technological capability to detect that I have had an overdose? The algorithm would be very similar – an initial alert to the wearer (to check it was not a false alarm), then an emergency message to a pre-nominated close family member or friend, and, if no response from these earlier levels, then a transmission of geo-location to emergency services. We are currently exploring this capability and will present findings on ability to detect opioid overdose.

    Thirdly, the need to develop better, more easy-to-use emergency interventions: If an overdose emergency is identified, then what action should be taken? Over the last decade, many countries have introduced training for drug users themselves, as well as for family members and care workers, to manage the overdose crisis while awaiting the arrival of the ambulance, including training in how to administer emergency naloxone to reverse the opioid-induced respiratory depression. An overview of the development of new concentrated naloxone nasal sprays will be presented, and also new work currently under way to explore the feasibility of a novel lyophilised buccal naloxone wafer/tablet to combine equivalent speed of onset with ultra-portable format to ensure constant carriage. 

     

    Speaker

    Chair: Professor Fiona Gaughran, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Professor Sir John Strang, King’s College London

    Read more about this speaker
  • Overview

    This presentation will cover the main findings of the Cass Review into Gender Identity Services for Children and Young People. It will focus on the implications for clinical practice and the challenges in achieving consensus on best approaches to care. The talk will also cover the priorities for research and the practical dilemmas in developing a stronger evidence base in the area.

    Speaker

    Chair: Dr Lade Smith, President, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Dr Hilary Cass, Chair of Independent review into Gender Identity Services for Children and Young People

    Read more about this speaker

  • 10.00am - 10.30am
    Lennox
    Morning break
  • Overview

    This session is aimed at providing practical, up to date advice, to support any psychiatrist who sees children and young people who are questioning their gender. 

    By the end of the session, delegates will feel more confident in understanding what to do and how best to support gender questioning patients.  

    The panel delivering the session comprises of a psychiatrist who works with gender questioning and transgender people, an expert by experience and Dr Hilary Cass, the author of the recently published independent review of gender identity services for children and young people. 
    The final report of the Cass review has brought into sharp relief the recognition that many of those who are questioning their gender have very limited access to the care they need. This is because of the dearth of healthcare practitioners who feel confident to work with people who are gender questioning, whatever their age.

    Cass recommended an holistic approach that emphasises the need for a comprehensive biopsychosocial assessment; individualised care plans taking into account the person’s wishes and preferences and an evidence-led approach. 

    The finding that many people who are gender questioning have concomitant mental health problems, means that psychiatrists are an important part of the care pathway. 

    Unfortunately, the toxic debate around gender identity and transgender issues, with heavily polarised views, has meant that the healthcare needs of people who are questioning their gender have been de-prioritised or even forgotten. This has also resulted in clinicians with more balanced views, or with no particular view, have been reluctant to work with this group of patients. 

    This session will be an opportunity for delegates ask questions and get practical advice to support patients who are questioning their gender.  

    Speakers

    Chair: Dr Lade Smith, President, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Dr Hilary Cass, Chair of Independent review into gender identity services for children and young people

    Sameera Jahagirdar, Expert by Experience

    Dr Seena Praveen, Consultant CAMHS Psychiatrist

  • Chair: Professor Joseph Hayes, Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London

    Patterns and timing of physical health diagnoses in people with severe mental illness and the implications for policy

    Dr Naomi Launders, Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London

    Severe mental illness and occurrence, outcomes and clinical care for diabetes

    Dr Caroline Jackson, Usher Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    Mr Cam Lugton, Office for Health Improvement and Disparities, London

  • Chair: Professor Femi Oyebode, University of Birmingham, Birmingham

    Dr Allan Beveridge, Royal College of Psychiatrists, Scotland

    Dr Rebecca Lawrence, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, Edinburgh

    The observer and observed: on storytelling that honours the complexity of psychosis

    Dr Nathan Filer, Bath Spa University, Bath

  • Chair: Professor Ian Jones, National Centre for Mental Health, Cardiff

    Dr Shereen Tadros, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London

    The role of genetic testing in mental health settings - recommendations from the College Report (CR237) 

    Dr Jana de Villiers, Chair of the ID Faculty for RCPsych in Scotland, Consultant Psychiatrist for the High Secure ID Service for Scotland and N Ireland, The State Hospital, Clinical Lead for Intellectual Disability for the Forensic Network, Edinburgh

    The all Wales psychiatric genomics service

    Professor James Walters, Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, Cardiff

    Patient and public engagement in psychiatric genetics - barriers and opportunities

    Dr David Crepaz-Keay, Mental Health Foundation, London

  • Chair: Professor Alan Carson, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    Neurological examination for psychiatrists

    Professor Adam Zeman, University of Exeter, Exeter

    Cognitive examination beyond the MMSE

    Professor Adam Zeman, University of Exeter, Exeter

  • All are welcome to attend this session - the focus will be on 'later-career' psychiatrists - SAS doctors and consultants beyond 5yrs in job

    Overview

    1. Learn about the utility of coaching and mentoring - whether one-to-one or in groups - in peer support, training and professional development 
    2. Hear about College resources, peer-support and coach-mentoring schemes across Divisions, Devolved Nations, Faculties and grades and share your reflections
    3. Try your hand at a practical skills exercise in relational skills-sets that are already familiar to psychiatrists, using common job and interpersonal scenarios, to enable appreciation of the two-way partnership of active listening and mutual reflection

    Speakers

    Jeya Balakrishna, Consultant Psychiatrist MOD and Assoc Registrar for Coaching and Mentoring

    Ricky Caplan, Consultant Psychiatrist and College Lead for Psychiatrists’ Support Service

  • Chair: Professor Russell Razzaque, North East London NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Does the end ever justify the means?

    Ms Diane Goslar, Expert by experience

    Justice in psychiatry

    Dr Gwen Adshead, Broadmoor Hospital, West London NHS Trust, London

    Ethical limits and compassion - reflection's from addictions

    Dr Emily Finch, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, London

    Introducing The Centre for Compassionate And Relational Learning (CCARL)

    Professor Russell Razzaque, North East London NHS Foundation Trust, London

  • Chair: Dr Josie Jenkinson, Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Imperial College London

    Implementing artificial intelligence for memory clinics

    Dr Timothy Rittman, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge University, Cambridge

    Advancing dementia assessment and care through large language models: a paradigm shift

    Dr Judith Harrison, CNTW NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle University, Newcastle

    Fly with AI: how can AI improve current dementia care?

    Professor Ramin Nilforooshan, University of Surrey, Imperial College London

  • Chair: Professor Subodh Dave, Dean, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Supporting your trainees to pass the CASC, and accessing reasonable adjustments

    Dr Ian Hall, Chief Examiner, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Supporting IMGs with the MRCPsych exam with a focus on the theory papers

    Dr Rahul Bhattacharya, East London NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Supporting all your trainees to pass the MRCPsych examination: making it personal

    Dr Stephanie Ewen, Maudsley Higher Training Scheme in Psychiatry of Intellectual Disability, London

  • Chair: Professor Daniel Smith, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    Depression and diabetes: shared mechanisms and treatment approaches

    Professor Khalida Ismail, King's College London, London

    Using genomic approaches to stratify severe mental illness by metabolism

    Dr Rona Strawbridge, University of Glasgow, Glasgow

    Pilot study of the ketogenic diet as a new treatment for bipolar disorder

    Dr Iain Campbell, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

  • Chair: Professor Alan Carson, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    Towards a biological definition? 

    Professor Anthony Lang

    Update on neuropsychiatry of Parkinson’s disease

    Professor Alan Carson, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh 

  • 1.10pm - 2.10pm
    Lennox
    Lunch
  • Screen: One
    Category: Quality improvement and research
    Judge: Fiona Gaughran

    Posters: Emergency Department (ED) walkouts in a mental health crisis: West London NHS Trust liaison psychiatry response to the London Metropolitan Police’s right care right person approach; The ten-point treatment programme: design and evaluation of an easy read document in a forensic learning disability unit; Pre-operative mental health and adverse outcomes following total knee replacement: a prospective cohort study; The association between severe mental illness and receipt of acute cardiac care for myocardial infarction, and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic; The appropriateness and end outcomes of urgent referrals to outpatient General Adult Psychiatry

    Screen: Two
    Category: Quality improvement, case study and research
    Judge: Dr Lindsey Sinclair

    Posters: Confidence in adherence to antidepressant prescribing guidelines among liaison psychiatrists; Development of an integrated electronic platform for ADHD medication initiation in child and adolescent mental health services; A rare case of rtms induced schizophrenia symptom switch; Obsessive-compulsive disorder and suicidality: a case control study; Acute cardiac care for people with severe mental illness following a myocardial infarction among people with a severe mental illness: a qualitative study
  • Meet your College Officers in this special session in the SAS Doctors lounge during the lunch break
  • Meet the Chief Examiner, Dr Ian Hall, and your new Chief Examiner, Dr Vivek Agarwal, who is taking over from Dr Ian Hall in late June, during this lunchtime session taking place in the student and trainees' lounge
  • Overview

    Dr Lade Smith talks to Dr Humphrey Needham-Bennett about the issues raised in his book, 'What We Fear Most' under the pen name Dr Ben Cave:  stigma, violence, racism, ECT, risks, the cumulative stress of patient care – plus the process of navigating the publishing process from concept to printed book.  

    Speakers

    Chair: Dr Lade Smith CBE, President, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Dr Humphrey Needham-Bennett FRCPsych writing as Dr Ben Cave

    Read more about this speaker

  • Overview

    During this talk, I will explore some of the ways in which journals contribute to bringing together various viewpoints and in shaping the field of mental health research. In the service and spirit of collaboration, I will also frame these ideas in terms of what the audience may not already know and with the hope of sparking new relationships among researchers, clinicians, people with lived experience, and journal editors.

    Speakers

    Chair: Dr Trudi Seneviratne, Registrar, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Rebecca E. Cooney, PhD, Nature Mental Health

    Read more about this speaker

  • 3.10pm - 3.40pm
    Lennox
    Afternoon break
  • Chair: Professor Jonathan Cavanagh, University of Glasgow, Glasgow

    What the next generation of animal models need to achieve

    Professor Emma Robinson, University of Bristol, Bristol

    Neurobiology of inflammation-induced behaviour

    Dr Rhona McGonigal, University of Glasgow, Glasgow

    CACNA1C gene – a view into synaptic mechanisms of psychiatric illness

    Dr Cezar Tigaret, Cardiff University, Cardiff

  • Chair: Professor Helen Minnis, University of Glasgow, Glasgow

    Learning from the national STADIA (Standardised Diagnostic Assessments in CAMHS) Trial

    Professor Kapil Sayal, University of Nottingham, Nottingham

    Identifying neurodivergence holistically and efficiently: the ESSENCE D tool

    Dr Jason Lang, University of Glasgow, Glasgow

    Measurement based care as part of a learning health system; lessons learned

    Professor Peter Szatmari, Cundill Centre for Child and Youth Depression, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto

  • Chair: Professor Kam Bhui, University of Oxford, Oxford

    Why a public health approach is needed

    Dr Jude Stansfield, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds

    Dr Sarah Markham, King's College London, London

    Dr Paul Gilluley, Chief Medical Officer for NEL ICB, London

    Professor Subodh Dave, Dean, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

  • Chair: Professor Nav Kapur, Centre for Mental Health and Safety, University of Manchester, Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester

    Prompt aftercare for self-harm and early intervention

    Dr Faraz Mughal, School of Medicine, Keele University, Keele

    Dr Alex Thomson, Department of Liaison Psychiatry, Northwick Park Hospital, Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Dr Karen Lascelles, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford

    NICE guidelines for self-harm: implementation and which way next?

    Professor Nav Kapur, Centre for Mental Health and Safety, University of Manchester, Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester

  • Chair: Professor Alan Carson, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    Future trends in dementia research

    Professor Siddharthan Chandran, Head of Dementia Research UK

    A structured approach to dementia investigation

    Dr Tim Wilkinson, Consultant Neurologist, Edinburgh
  • Chair: Dr Ian Goodyer, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, University College London, London

    Brief psychotherapies: their effects, prospects and delivery to a growing demand 

    Dr Ian Goodyer, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, University College London, London

    Diet quality as a treatment target in adolescent MDD: examining the evidence and results from a novel intervention

    Dr Daphne Korczak, The Hospital for Sick Children, The University of Toronto, Toronto

    Targeting sleep to improve youth depression: challenges and new solutions

    Dr Madison Aitken, York University, Toronto 

    Formulation, is it complex or simple?

    Dr Raphael Kelvin, CambridgeBPI Ltd and NHS England MindEd National Clinical Educator Lead, Technology Enhanced Learning

  • Chair: Professor Vivienne Curtis, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Dr Alan Baban, Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Dr Jo O'Reilly, Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust, London

  • Chair: Dr Kathleen Merikangas, National Institute of Mental Health, Washington and Professor Ian Jones, Congress Co-Chair

    Key findings from the Bipolar Commission

    Simon Kitchen, Bipolar UK

    The importance of diagnosis from a lived experience perspective

    Eve Mair, Bipolar UK

    Making the diagnosis and choosing the correct medication

    Professor Allan Young, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London

    Lifestyle approaches to preventing relapse

    Professor Daniel Smith, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

  • Chair: Professor David Kingdon, University of Southampton, Southampton

    Lessons from the RADAR trial of supported antipsychotic reduction 

    Professor Joanna Moncrieff, University College London, London

    Experiences of antipsychotic reductions in the RADAR trial: a qualitative study of service users

    Professor Nicola Morant, University College London, London

    RADAR doesn’t detect everything!

    Professor Robin Murray, King's College London, London

  • Chair: Professor Alan Carson, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    Why FND is a feminist issue

    Dr Caoimhe McLoughlin, Research Fellow/ hon Consultant Neuropsychiatrist, Edinburgh

    Functional cognitive disorders

    Dr Veronica Cabreira, Research fellow Neurology, Edinburgh

     

  • Overview

    Art-based methods serve as a powerful tool for individuals to showcase their emotions, experiences, needs, and narratives. These methods have proven to reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness and foster a sense of community support for those facing mental health challenges. One of the most popular arts-based approaches is the Theatre of the Oppressed (TO). In this session, we will show a glimpse of the Theatre of the Oppressed. Our audience will have the opportunity to become active "spect-actors" who will not only witness but actively engage with the staged narratives, fostering positive change. In this session, the delegates will gain insights into how the Theatre of the Oppressed techniques have been used in India and Pakistan to empower people with the lived experience of mental illness and to engage the local community, including patients, caregivers, their families, and neighbouring community members, to participate in a dialogue and discussion on mental health.

    Speakers

    Komal Dayani, Queen Mary University, London
    Kainat Khurshid, Interactive Research Development, Pakistan
    Mangala R, Schizophrenia Research Foundation, India
    Mr Mehmood Bhatti, Interactive Research Development, Pakistan
    Ms Harini Jayaraman, Schizophrenia Research Foundation, India
    Dr Victoria Bird, Queen Mary University of London, London
    Renata Peppl, Queen Mary University of London, London
    Rosie Hunter, Queen Mary University of London, London

  • Overview

    Former Dean of RCPsych, Dr Kate Lovett is delighted to introduce you to the story and work of internationally acclaimed jazz musician, Jeremy Sassoon.

    Jeremy’s story is a fascinating one. Selected to attend the Royal Northern College of Music as a child Jeremy’s musical talent was never in doubt. However, in what he describes as an act of teenage rebellion he shunned a musical career for one in medicine, qualifying from the Middlesex medical school in 1988. He then went on to train as a psychiatrist in Manchester alongside being a key member of the iconic 1990s “Diagnosing the Blues” band.

    In 1995 Jeremy rocked the Manchester psychiatric establishment by deciding to leave the profession to focus full-time on his blossoming musical career. Denied the opportunity to train flexibly, Kate Lovett credits witnessing his existential struggle to combine his talents in a rigid system, as fuel throughout her career to make training systems better.

    Since choosing music, Jeremy has become a highly successful singer/pianist. In this spellbinding performance, Jeremy will reflect candidly on both his careers and his own mental health, through music and storytelling, ultimately concluding that music and psychiatry are not so very far apart.

    Speakers

    Dr Kate Lovett, Livewell Southwest
    Jeremy Sassoon

  • Overview

    Whilst in Scotland why not learn a little of the national dance. Set to bagpipe music Highland dancing is a style of competitive dancing developed in the Scottish Highlands in the 19th and 20th centuries. Did you know ... a Highland Dancer will hop or spring vertically 192 times during a 6 step Highland Fling, that is the equivalent as running a mile on one foot at a time. This session will showcase a number of different highland dances and then give you the opportunity to learn the basic positions and the first step of the highland fling.

    Speakers

    Dr Rosemary Gordon, NHS Lothian, Scotland

  • We will be returning this year with our ever popular Congress party!

    We can't wait to welcome you for an evening packed full of dancing, music, food and socialising at Ghillie Dhu, a traditional Scottish bar and restaurant. Originally St Thomas Episcopal Church, Ghillie Dhu has been beautifully restored to showcase its traditional features and is a stunning example of the capitals intricate architecture.

    Book your ticket now and find out more information about the party on our website. Don't forget, we have sold out in the past, so book early to avoid disappointment!

  • 8.00am - 9.00am
    Strathblane hall
    Registration
  • Staying calm in the midst of a storm - mindfulness for psychiatrists

    The current NHS pressures put a huge strain on the NHS, and on psychiatry staff at all levels, and in all sub-specialties. Emotional well-being of psychiatrists and the population as a whole is affected by the uncertainty and the sense of unrelenting demands arising from the crisis, aggravated further by a catastrophic economic downturn and societal dissatisfaction. Strikes of consultants and junior doctors have highlighted the sense of unease in psychiatry, and medicine at large. 

    Mindfulness-based intervention can have a positive influence on the well-being of health professionals as reflected by the NICE guidance for staff well-being recommending mindfulness-based programs (NICE March 2022) . 

    Florian Ruths and Joy Patterson  have developed a taster program of three  45-minute sessions during the congress to introduce psychiatrists to the ideas of mindfulness.

    Mindfulness for Psychiatrists (M4P) are three daily, brief, practical introductions to mindfulness during challenging times for psychiatry and the world at large. Its aim is to provide psychiatrists with a tool to touch base with calmness, self-compassion, keeping perspective and enhancing self-regulation and well-being while under clinical, social and personal pressure. The three sessions are different and can be enjoyed as a series. Each session works on its own as well.

    Facilitators

    Dr Florian Alexander Ruths, Maudsley Hospital

    Dr Joy Patterson, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust

  • Overview

    Bombay Jam is the ultimate dance fitness total body workout set to custom music mixes with the hottest Bollywood tracks combined with Western Top 40 songs for instant universal appeal. It is packed with authentic Bollywood flavour and suitable for all genders, ages, fitness levels. No dance experience needed. It’s so much fun. What're you waiting for?

    Facilitators

    Dr Swapna Gambhir, Consultant Anaesthetist, Lifestyle Medicine Physician, Certified Fitness Instructor 
  • Overview

    In this talk I will detail latest computational approaches to mapping the meaning of awe, the emotion we feel when we encounter vast mysteries.  I then will chart latest advances in understanding how to cultivate awe as a pathway to mental and physical health.

    Speakers

    Chair: Professor Hugo Critchley, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton

    Dacher Keltner, UC Berkeley

    Find out more about this speaker

  • Overview

    Around a third of people who experience psychosis develop complex problems that complicate recovery. Mental health rehabilitation services focus on this group. This presentation will provide an overview of the evidence showing that these services are effective, and why they should be included in every local mental health system.

    Speakers

    Chair: Professor Ian Jones, Congress Co-Chair

    Professor Helen Killaspy, Professor of Rehabilitation Psychiatry, Division of Psychiatry, University College London

    Read more about this speaker

     

  • 10.00am - 10.30am
    Lennox
    Morning break
  • Chair: Dr Rajesh Mohan, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, London

    Ms Meera Burgess, Expert by experience

    The 10 top tips of co-production

    Mr Mark Farmer, Expert by experience

  • Chair: Dr Raja Badrakalimuthu, Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford, Parliamentary and Healthcare Ombudsman Service, Dementia Carers Count, London

    A propensity score analysis of retrograde amnesia following ECT versus pharmacotherapy for depression

    Professor Declan McLoughlin, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin

    Cumulative cognitive deficits after ECT

    Professor George Kirov, Cardiff University, Cardiff

    Continuation/maintenance ECT and cognition

    Associate Professor Prashanth Mayur, University of Sydney, Sydney, Westmead Institute of Medical Research, Westmead, St John of God Hospital, North Richmond, Cumberland Hospital, Westmead

  • Chair: Dr Lade Smith CBE, President, Royal College of Psychiatrists and Steve Gilbert, Steve Gilbert Consulting

    Why have rates of involuntary detention increased and how best to respond?

    Dr Patrick Keown, Cumbria, Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle

    Reducing involuntary hospitalisation rates and improving therapeutic relationships: Advance Choice Document fidelity and sustainability

    Professor Claire Henderson, King's College London, London

    Ethnicity and Mental Health Act: addressing disparities and rising rates of detention 

    Professor Kam Bhui, University of Oxford, Oxford

  • Chair: Dr Peter Byrne, East London Foundation Trust, London

    Why the RCPsych and others wanted a minimum unit price for alcohol in Scotland, and why it took five years from legislation to implementation

    Dr Peter Rice, Institute of Alcohol Studies, Glasgow

    Dr May Van Schalkwyk, London school of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London

    Commercial determinants of health, policy and health inequalities

    Professor Mark Petticrew, London school of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London

  • Chair: Dr Sameer Jauhar, Institute of Psychaitry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London

    Serotonin and depression: 50 years of hurt?

    Professor Phillip Cowen, University of Oxford, Oxford

    Schizophrenia: from neurotransmitters to circuits, symptoms and novel treatments

    Dr Katherine Beck, Institute of Psychaitry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London

    What is the role of dopamine and serotonin in how people think?

    Dr Michael Browning, University of Oxford, Oxford

  • Chair: Dr Konstantinos Ioannidis, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

    The use of clozapine in routine clinical practice: QI issues identified by clinical audit

    Dr Carol Paton, Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust, Dartford

    Community initiation of clozapine 

    Ms Emma Butler, King's College London, London

    Does poor previous adherence to antipsychotics represent a real barrier to the initiation of clozapine?

    Dr Sébastien Brodeur, Laval University, Quebec

  • Chair: Dr Lucy Carrick, Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Glasgow

    Variation in quality and effectiveness: how data-driven national programmes can help improve the provision of rehabilitation and recovery services

    Dr Sridevi Kalidindi, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    The ACER Study (Assessing the clinical and cost effectiveness of inpatient mental health rehabilitation provided by the independent sector and NHS)

    Professor Helen Killaspy, Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Dr Rajesh Mohan, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

  • Chair: Dr Ed Beveridge, UCLPartners, North London Mental Health Partnership, London

    Introducing the framework and why we need it 

    Ms Gemma Copsey, UCLPartners, London

    The research into the implementation of UCLP-Primrose - key findings and lessons learned

    Dr Philippa Shaw, University College London, London and Dr Zuneera Khurshid, Improvement Academy at the Bradford Institute for Health Research, London

    UCLP-PRIMROSE findings discussion: the implications for research, policy, and practice

    Professor David Osborn,  University College London, North London Mental Health Partnership, Public Health England, London

    Results from implementing UCLPartners-PRIMROSE, a care innovation for patients in London and Yorkshire/Humber 

    Dr Gregor Russell. Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, Yorkshire and Humber Clinical Research Network, University of York, York

  • Chair: Dr Lenny Cornwall, Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Trust, Middlesbrough

    Gender dysphoria and mental disorders in adolescence - implications for treatment

    Professor Riittakertu Kaltiala, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland

    Evaluating the evidence for puberty blockers as a treatment for gender dysphoria in adolescents

    Dr Michael Biggs, Oxford University, Oxford

    The impact of suppressing puberty on neuropsychological function

    Professor Sallie Baxendale, University College London, London

  • Chair: Dr Trudi Seneviratne, Registrar, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    “Too girly” to be a doctor: strengths and stereotypes in leadership language

    Miss Nikki Nabavi, University of Manchester, Manchester

    It is easy for me, I'm not a mum!

    Dr Rosemary Gordon, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh

    Dr Suhana Ahmed, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, London

  • 1.10pm -2.10pm
    Lennox
    Lunch
  • 1.10pm - 2.10pm
    Cromdale
    Fringe: Art workshop
  • Screen: One
    Category: Quality improvement and research
    Judge: 

    Posters: Improving the completion of capacity and consent assessments; Introducing step-down summaries to the intensive psychiatric care unit; BMAL1 genetic variation in metabolic and mental health; Exploring the distinction between jinn possession and serious mental disorders through the lens of the traditional and faith-based healers in Korail Slum; The effectiveness of antipsychotic drug therapy for treating psychosis in people with epilepsy - a systematic review

    Screen: Two
    Category: Service evaluation and research
    Judge: Peter Woodruff

    Posters: Evaluation of tertiary neuropsychiatry pilot service: pitfalls, challenges, outcomes, and success; Choices today, behaviours tomorrow: longitudinal associations between childhood risky decision-making and adolescent conduct disorder behaviours - a nationally representative prospective cohort study in the United Kingdom; The social and clinical factors associated with Mental Health Act (MHA) use among children and adolescent inpatients: a cohort study using electronic health records; “Motiv8”: a cluster-randomized feasibility trial of a weight management intervention for adults with severe mental illness in secure forensic services- Feasibility indicators and clinical demographics
  • 1.10pm - 2.10pm
    Lowther
    SAS doctors lounge: Coaching and mentoring
  • Meet your PTC officers during this lunch time session taking place in the student and trainees' lounge
  • Speakers

    Chair: Professor John Crichton, Treasurer, Royal College of Psychiatrists

    Judge Tim Eicke, European Court of Human Rights

    Read more about this speaker

  • Chair: Professor Megan Galbally, Monash University, Melbourne

    Potential hazards associated with use of lamotrigine during pregnancy

    Professor David Baldwin, University of Southampton, Southampton

    Valproate: a bigger scandal than thalidomide

    Professor David Cunningham Owens, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh

    Potential hazards associated with use of lithium preparations during pregnancy

    Professor Ian Jones, Cardiff University, Cardiff

  • Chair: Dr Trudi Seneviratne, Registrar, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London

    Dr Amrit Sachar, West London NHS Trust, London

    Courage, compassion and clarity: creating the conditions for anti-racism 

    Dr Ananta Dave, Black Country Integrated Care System, Wolverhampton

    Dr Rajesh Mohan, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

  • Chair: Dr Catherine Durkin, Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust, London

    The most dangerous women: what do we know about psychopathy and understanding risk in high security female prisoners?

    Dr Bernard Chin, North London Forensic Service, London

    Dangerous obsessions?: females who stalk 

    Dr Eleanor Hind, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London

    Dangerous mothers: risk in factitious and induced illness 

    Dr Gwen Adshead, Broadmoor Hospital, West London NHS Trust, London

  • Chair: Dr Konstantinos Ioannidis, Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton

    Gambling disorder in the UK: an overview

    Professor Henrietta Bowden-Jones, National Centre for Behavioural Addictions, London

    Clinical presentation of gambling disorder, biopsychosocial models, consequences, comorbidities, as well as screening and diagnostic tools

    Professor Sam Chamberlain, University of Southampton, Southampton

    Pharmacological treatment of gambling disorder

    Professor Jon Grant, University of Chicago, Chicago

  • Chair: Dr Conor Davidson, Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Leeds

    Who we really are - confounding expectations of autistic women

    Mrs Rhiannon Hawkins, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London 

    Fashionably late: autistic females

    Dr Alison Lennox, Oxford Health, Oxford

    Autism and borderline personality disorder

    Dr Kirsten Barnicot, City University, London

    Mental health in autistic women

    Professor Dheeraj Rai, Avon and Wiltshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol Medical School, Bristol