Our programme resources

The NCCMH and NCISH have developed a range of resources for the Suicide Prevention Programme that are free to access and use. 

10 ways to improve safety

Based on over 20 years of research evidence from studies of mental health services, primary care and accident and emergency departments, NCISH have developed a list of 10 key elements for safer care for patients. These recommendations have been shown to reduce suicide rates. NCISH’s '10 ways to improve safety' provides recommended examples local areas can focus on to reduce suicide and self-harm among mental health patients. You can find more resources on our suicide in mental health patients page.

Data dictionary

NCISH developed the data dictionary to provide a selection of process measures for local areas in Wave 2, and any other areas implementing a self-harm and/or suicide prevention project, to measure change as they test new ideas within their projects.

Learning sets 

Participants in the Suicide Prevention Programme, attend bimonthly events – called ‘learning sets’ – to share their learning. You’ll find the resources from these learning sets below.

Learning Set Agenda

 

Research Update: Professor Louis Appleby presents the latest findings on self-harm and suicide prevention at the Suicide Prevention Learning Set on the 2nd December 2021.

 

Prof. Louis Appleby's slides

 

Presentation: Seher Kayikci, Jane Brett-Jones and Gabriella Baker share their recent work on using data and insights from the London RTSS to support suicide prevention across North Central London. 

 

North Central London slides

 

Presentation: Alice Hendy, CEO and Founder of the R;pple Suicide Prevention tool, shares how the tool works and how it can be used in different settings. 

 

Alice's slides

 

Presentation: Katherine Trinder presents the suicide prevention resource being developed in West Yorkshire.  

 

West Yorkshire's slides

Learning Set Agenda

Research Update: Professor Nav Kapur from the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health (NCISH) shared the team’s latest findings, including data in relation to COVID-19; service contact and suicide prevention opportunities for middle-aged men; suicide and ethnicity; self-harm and information sharing.

 

 

Nav's slides

Language to describe someone in suicide crisis: Liz Howlett and Sue Wilgoss from Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust gave a powerful presentation around the impact on patients and carers of the language health professionals use when talking about suicide. Liz and Sue shared details of the work that the Trust have been carrying out to ensure a change in the culture and language, which includes holding regular webinars with service users and carers presenting their own experiences. 

 

NSFT slides

Minimising ligature harm: Maggie Gairdner, Director of Mental Health Services, and Jo Lynch, Deputy Chief Nurse, Surrey and Borders Partnership Foundation Trust presented on their work around minimising ligature harm. For further details please email suicideprevention@rcpsych.ac.uk


Learning Set Agenda

Professor Nav Kapur from the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health (NCISH) shared the team’s latest findings, including data in relation to COVID-19, suicidal behaviour and ethnicity, and NSICH’s recently released annual report. 

Nav's presentation slides


Vicki Wagstaff, Clinical Network Manager – Mental Health, in the Healthier Lancashire and South Cumbria Mental Health Team, shared about the Orange Button Community Scheme, an initiative linked to quality assured and currently funded existing suicide prevention training. Those who have undertaken the training have an orange button to signify that the wearer is happy to say/hear the word suicide, can listen without judgement and can support people with signposting. Vicki shared how the training has been delivered, how the initiative has gained interest and plans for the future. Vicki's presentation slides provide more information about the scheme

Learning Set Agenda


Professor Louis Appleby from the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health (NCISH) shared the team’s latest findings, including a recently published report detailing that suicide rates in England did not rise following the first national lockdown in 2020, despite higher levels of greater distress. Professor Appleby also discussed the fact that these are early figures and the potential longer-term effects, and also presented research from other countries’ real-time surveillance data.

Louis' presentation slides.

 

Catherine Phillips, Carers Lead, DIALOG+ & Safety Planning Trainer, and Deirdre Williams, Clinical Psychologist, at Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust shared how they are working with carers to increase long term safety in adults with chronic suicide risk.

Catherine and Deirdre's presentation slides.

 

Sue Willgoss, Advisor for Suicide Prevention at Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust (NSFT), shared her very moving story on how she is working with NSFT to make positive change after the loss of her son to suicide, including improving support for patients or people in crisis and increasing awareness for staff in the Trust. Liz Howlett, Suicide Prevention Lead for NSFT, also shared her views on the Suicide Prevention Advisor role.

Sue's presentation slides.

 

Marie Ash, Senior Peer Support Worker in the Safer from Suicide Team at Devon Partnership NHS Trust, shared the very inspirational story of the Letter of Hope, a letter of support written by people with lived experience from Devon, who wish to offer help and hope to those who are thinking about suicide. Marie shared how the letter was written and a recording is included in the presentation, read aloud by those involved in writing the letter. Marie has very helpfully shared her supplementary notes for today's presentation, including her own letter of hope. More information, including downloadable copies of the letter and audio file are available on Devon Partnership's website.

Marie's presentation slides.

Professor Nav Kapur from the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health (NCISH) shares their latest findings, including real-time data collection on suicide and self-harm during the COVID-19 pandemic from across the world.

Professor Nav Kapur from the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health (NCISH) shares their latest findings, including real-time data collection during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Katherine McGleenan, Suicide Prevention Lead in North East & North Cumbria ICS, and Chris Wood from Every Life Matters share the positive impact of multi-agency working during COVID-19, the product of which was a mental health and wellbeing booklet delivered to millions of homes in the region.

 

Tim Woodhouse, Suicide Prevention Programme Manager at Kent and Medway STP, shares work that he and his colleague Megan Abbott, Suicide Prevention Project Support Officer, have carried out on the relationship between domestic abuse and suicide using real-time surveillance data during 2020. 

 

Dr Helen Smith, Clinical Lead for the Mental Health Safety Improvement Programme, provides theory and tips on how to scale up and spread quality improvement.

 

Professor Louis Appleby from the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health (NCISH) shares their latest findings, including real-time data collection during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Louise Thomas and Vicki Wagstaff from Lancashire and South Cumbria Integrated Care System (ICS) share their progress and plans for suicide prevention since Wave 1 of the Suicide Prevention Programme, including the importance of multi-agency working and working alongside people with lived experience. 

 

Dr Michael Doyle and Lin Harrison from West Yorkshire and Harrogate Integrated Care System (ICS), a trailblazer site on the Suicide Prevention Programme, share their progress and plans for their suicide prevention strategy. This includes their work on reducing risk in men, one of the three main priority areas identified in the National Suicide Prevention Strategy.

 

Monthly telephone clinics

In Wave 2 of the Suicide Prevention Programme, organisations across England joined monthly telephone clinics to seek advice and share learning about how to prevent suicide and self-harm. You’ll find the resources from the monthly telephone clinics below.

Workshops

Wave 4 of the Suicide Prevention Programme started in May 2021 and includes organisations across all of England, enabling participants to join bi-monthly virtual workshops to seek advice and share learning about how to prevent suicide and self-harm. You’ll find the resources from the Wave 3 and 4 workshops below.